A Flight 23 Squadron Naples 10 November 1943 Redux

Rich Cooper had sent this picture part of Theodore Griffith’s collection.

Donald Hepworth Bentley has to be on this picture if he was with A Flight.

A flight 23 Squadron Naples 10 November 1943 bw

A Flight 23 Squadron
Naples 10 November 1943

Theo Griffiths is the fourth man second row on the left.

Donald Bentley died on November 20, 1943.

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He has to be there with his navigator Sergeant Causeway.

If you have any information, please feel free to contact me.

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Donald Hepworth Bentley

From this comment sent from Paul, a cousin of Donald…

I have just located this site on my iPad. My relative, Donald Hepworth Bentley, was a Flight  Sergeant with 23 squadron based at Luca in Malta. His navigator was a Sgt Causeway. They were both killed September 1943 and are buried together in the cemetery in San Marino. The grave has the propeller from the Mosquito mounted on it.

I have photos if any one interested.
They were 23 years old and had trained in Canada.

To this  picture he shared with me so I could share it with my readers…

Donald

Flight Sergeant Bentley

This will be the first post about that Mosquito pilot.

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The first of many posts about a pilot who flew this type of plane…

Malta Mosquito

And who is buried in San Marino Town Cemetery in Italy with his navigator.

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Maybe there is a logbook somewhere.

If you have any information, please feel free to contact me.

Editorial

This editorial is taken from this scanned image sent by Rich Cooper.

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This is the front cover.

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Editorial

EIGHT weeks at Souther Field have left us only two more in which to complete the course and, because printers are impatient people, it is time to say goodbye.

Regret at leaving is mingled with pride in having traveled at least a third, perhaps the thorniest part, of the road to our “Wings;” and if we part from our friends and various tutors now, it is with the assurance that we are not, yet, going far, and shall return from time to time to visit them.

We owe a great debt both to our flying instructors, patient and—for their peace of mind—fearless men all, and to those who have guided us through Ground School, whom doubtless we shall remember again over Germany in darkness, where a warm front meets a cold, and we have a spluttering engine.

We are grateful to Lieutenant Rood and his staff for a number of things, not least for helping strangers in a new, if charming, country; and from Mr. Graham and his employees we could not possibly have expected more in comfort, good food, and sympathetic consideration We thank them, one and all, from our hearts.

To turn to our own domestic affairs, we bid a belated, but sincere, farewell to Flight-Lieutenant Speck and wish him the best of luck wherever he may go. At the same time we extend a hearty welcome to our new Administration Officer, Flight-Lieutenant Easton Smith.

We record, with deepest regret. the tragic deaths of Peter George Hills and Harold Norman Evans in a bathing accident at Jacksonville, Florida, on 2nd November, 1941. These two young fliers, of Class 42C, had just completed their training here and met their deaths while on leave before proceeding to Basic School at Macon. We do not need to emphasize the tragedy of this particular ending to two young lives on the threshold of such a great service to their country, and our deepest sympathies arc accorded to the bereaved families and to the many friends who knew and loved them here.

—E. H. M. RELTON.

If you have any information, please feel free to contact me.

More from Rich Cooper

This was just sent by Rich Cooper.

Hi Pierre,

Have uncovered some more amazing documents and photos from Theo. The first runs are a front to back copy of a publication The Southern Cadet. Hope you can make it all out. Particularly interested in the lists of Theo’s colleagues towards the back and the photos on the inside and outside back cover.

It’s about Theo Griffiths who flew with 23 Squadron.

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Theo was stationed there in 1942.

Here are more pages of the document.

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Last photo is number 5 intake at Leconfield. There are many more photos which I found in an album relating to Theo’s training, war service and visiting home. There are still many other photos still to share but the publication is what I thought might raise the most interest.

Theo can still talk about his service days. The documentary about the Mosquito that was bought back to life last year really lights him up.

Regards
Rich Cooper

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If you have any information, please feel free to contact me.