The story behind a comment

This comment deserves to be shared. I am hoping someone might help this reader.

Hi Pierre

It’s been a while since I was last in touch with you (2014) regarding a sand coloured bag from a car boot sale and that it had written on the side of the bag is the name of F/L J R Tracey (John Robert Tracey)

23 Squadron

The reason I am asking is I was wondering if you ever got any feedback from anyone regarding this chap you did send me some info I am still very curious and any other info would be greatly appreciated.

You said that you have found out that he was a Flight Lieutenant (War Substantive) 1943 general duties branch that’s all I know so far.

| Date: | 11-APR-1945

| | Time:

| | | Type: | de Havilland Mosquito FB.Mk VI

| | Owner/operator: | 605 (County of Warwick) Sqn RAF

| | Registration: | PZ464

| | C/n / msn:

| | | Fatalities:

| Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2

| | Airplane damage: | Written off (damaged beyond repair)

| | Location: | Nr Berlín – Germany

| | Phase: | En route

| | Nature: | Military

| | Departure airport: | B.71 Coxyde (B)

| | Destination airport:
| |

Narrative: PZ464 FBVI 605 Missing from night intruder 11.4.45 Crew: F/Lt (62690) John Robert TRACEY (pilot) RAFVR – killed F/Lt (131.763) Frank BERESFORD (nav.) na PZ464.

Strange as it may seem his family lived in Birmingham six or seven miles from where I live. I live on the West Bromwich/Dudley border in an area called the Black Country due to all the industry or the lack of it these days. I live on top of hill where we can see for miles around Birmingham, West Bromwich Dudley, Halesowen, Cradley Heath, etc. All heavy industrial areas. We had on the top of the hill where I live AAA barracks and anti-aircraft guns one of the large guns inherited the name Big Bertha on one sad occasion they fired a faulty round, It landed a couple of miles away on the boat pub were a wedding party were having there celebration so many killed and injured.

Intruder mission, I think. flying around German aerodromes waiting for night fighters coming in to refuel and rearm.

They were called Night Bandits. I wrote something on the blog.

He may have been a footballer before the war?

I have been trying to find out if he did play for Nott’s County FC I have checked the date of birth and there were no other people born around the same time as he was with the same name so it is still possible he could have played I seem to be drawing a blank, what type of mission do you think he was on and how sad for him to have died less than 1 month from the end of the war in Europe.

I found this on an Aussie site. It says that PZ464 belonged to various squadrons at different stages in its life 605 sqn 464 sqn RAAF 605 sqn and then I presume 23 sqn where it didn’t return from its mission with both on board killed. Where can I find out the date the aircraft was registered? I will have another look tomorrow to see if I can find out anything more about the aircrew. Please keep me informed if you come across info as I find it all very interesting.

You also said you could not find anywhere in your notes about 23 Squadron with those two airmen’s names during that time period. Tracey must have been doing his second or third tour. This is what is most interesting. RAF airmen flew more than one tour of operations. His name is not honoured anywhere!

This is why I want to find more about him and the bag is just a pretext. You have history in your hands my friend! You said we have to write this and pay homage to this pilot and navigator.

I would love to find out what medals he would have been awarded and any other theatres of operations he may have flown in.

Kind Regards (Keep up the good work you do)

Steve Gilbert

What we know…

Source

23 Squadron
21/22-July-1943
HJ761
FB.VI
YP-E
Ju 88 Destroyed at Foggia, Italy
F/L J.R. Tracey and F/O F. Beresford
23 Squadron
21/22-July-1943
HJ761
FB.VI
YP-E
Ju 88 Probably destroyed at Foggia, Italy
F/L J.R. Tracey and F/O F. Beresford

Remembrance Day 2018 – William Herbert Rogers (1920-1944)

Update about the pilot

After the war my father joined the BBC and worked for them till 1969. He was involved in the Nuremberg trials in Germany but as you will know most of the people who survived the war rarely spoke about their experiences of that time. He was briefly posted to Germany working for the BBC overseas network back in 1951. My father married my mother in 1950 and my twin sister and I were born in 1951. My younger sister was born in 1954. My father and the family spent 3 years in Sydney Australia on an exchange with the BBC and  the Australian broadcasting corporation from 1956 to 1959 when we returned to Britain. We eventually moved to Edgbaston in Birmingham where he became Head of the Midland Region of the BBC until 1969. He then spent 3 years in Singapore as an advisor with the British overseas commission. On his return he was then sent to Tonga for a 2 year stint. He had become a specialist in multilingual broadcasting. On his return to Britain he took up simultaneous translation for visiting Germans and also translated german technical papers. Of course he was fluent in German and spoke it like a native! Sadly he developed Motor Neurone Disease and died in 1990. He was still working on translations and was teaching himself Isaiah and Chinese. He was fluent in German, French and Italian as well as having a working knowledge of Dutch. He was highly intelligent and did not suffer fools gladly. That is not to say that he was unkind but he had a brilliant wit! He kept in touch with several well known actors who he met during the war.

T

 

ORIGINAL POST

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen and also those who survived.

A flight 23 Squadron Naples 10 November 1943

Collection Theo Griffiths (courtesy Richard Cooper)

According to my genealogical research, William Herbert Rogers was born on April 8, 1920, in Teignmouth, Devon, England. His father was William Morrott Rogers and his mother was Ellen Elizabeth Passmore (maiden name to be validated). He had one brother Earnest and two sisters Ada Winifred and Nellie (to be validated also). 

Mosquito FB Mark VI, serial HJ674, of 23 Squadron, was lost in an intruder mission over Sorbolo in the Province of Parma. The plane took off from Alghero, Sardinia, in the night of February 6,1944. The crew was F/Lt (64901) David Leslie Porter (pilot) RAFVR was taken prisoner and F/O (147669) William Herbert ROGERS (navigator) RAFVR – was killed.

F/Lt David Leslie Porter survived and became a prisoner of war. He was taken to Stalag Luft 3 according to my research. His navigator is buried in the Milan War Cemetery.

William Herbert Rogers is remembered on this Website.

Readers have contributed to this blog since 2010 when it was first created. RAF 23 Squadron was unknown to me as well as the pilots and navigators. Little by little my knowledge grew with each comment. Since 2010 there were more than 1,000 comments made.

This is post No. 420 which follows post No. 419.

Someday someone will probably comment on William Herbert Rogers or David Leslie Porter who survived the war. If this happens, my interest about 23 Squadron will be rekindled once more, and I will write another post.

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen and also those who survived.

William Herbert Rogers and David Leslie Porter are probably on this group picture. I have no way to tell. 

a-flight-23-squadron-naples-10-november-1943-bw

A Flight 23 Squadron
10 November 1943
Naples

Remembrance Day 2018 – William Herbert Rogers (1920-1944)

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen and also those who survived.

A flight 23 Squadron Naples 10 November 1943

Collection Theo Griffiths (courtesy Richard Cooper)

According to my genealogical research, William Herbert Rogers was born on April 8, 1920, in Teignmouth, Devon, England. His father was William Morrott Rogers and his mother was Ellen Elizabeth Passmore (maiden name to be validated). He had one brother Earnest and two sisters Ada Winifred and Nellie (to be validated also). 

Mosquito FB Mark VI, serial HJ674, of 23 Squadron, was lost in an intruder mission over Sorbolo in the Province of Parma. The plane took off from Alghero, Sardinia, in the night of February 6,1944. The crew was F/Lt (64901) David Leslie Porter (pilot) RAFVR was taken prisoner and F/O (147669) William Herbert ROGERS (navigator) RAFVR – was killed.

F/Lt David Leslie Porter survived and became a prisoner of war. He was taken to Stalag Luft 3 according to my research. His navigator is buried in the Milan War Cemetery.

William Herbert Rogers is remembered on this Website.

Readers have contributed to this blog since 2010 when it was first created. RAF 23 Squadron was unknown to me as well as the pilots and navigators. Little by little my knowledge grew with each comment. Since 2010 there were more than 1,000 comments made.

This is post No. 420 which follows post No. 419.

Someday someone will probably comment on William Herbert Rogers or David Leslie Porter who survived the war. If this happens, my interest about 23 Squadron will be rekindled once more, and I will write another post.

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen and also those who survived.

William Herbert Rogers and David Leslie Porter are probably on this group picture. I have no way to tell. 

a-flight-23-squadron-naples-10-november-1943-bw

A Flight 23 Squadron
10 November 1943
Naples

Remembrance Day 2018

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen.

I found this message in my inbox this morning as I was cleaning it up.

Hello, thanks for your wonderful blog. Nothing about Captain D. Porter and Lieut. W.H. Rogers? They died on February 6, 1944 near my town (Reggio Emilia).

I felt it was important to follow up on it. I did not have anything about this crew so I asked for more information.

The reply was as fast as a Mosquito!

Mosquito FB-VI serial HJ674, 23 Squadron, lost in an intruder mission over SORBOLO (Province of Parma), from ALGHERO, in the night of February 6,1944. Crew F/Lt (64901) David Leslie PORTER (pilot) RAFVR – PoW and F/O (147669) William Herbert ROGERS (nav.) RAFVR – killed.

This is how I still start…

http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=72781

I know some of my readers might help with this.

You have to start somewhere…

The best way might be to write me a comment.

I have just found out my 1st cousin, once removed was a navigator in 23 Squadron based in Malta 1942-1943. Sgt Leslie GREEN, 1556380, is buried at Catania War Cemetery, Sicily, after his Mosquito crashed on landing back at Malta on 5th September 1943, following night disruption flights over Italy. I am interested to find anything more about him, and in particular a picture.

To be continued.

News from 418 Squadron

A reader got interested in a post about 418 Squadron, and she is sharing this:

Hello Pierre

Please find attached images which belonged to my late aunt. I’m sorry I have no information as to which newspaper the cuttings are from although I have tried searching on a couple of newspaper websites without success. I suspect they may have been from a London evening newspaper (Evening Standard or Evening News) or possibly one local to RAF Ford? It may be possible to find out online.

I’m also attaching a photo of my aunt, (Mary) Joan Jamieson (1918-2007) who is standing pointing at a wall map. This may well have been taken at RAF Ford, but I’m afraid I don’t know for sure. I believe she was a wireless operator in the WAAF.
I hope they will prove of interest.

Kind regards

Click on each image for a larger view.

Photos are from Alison Botterill, on behalf of Joan Jamieson (1918-2007)…

Squadron Leader Kipp

Squadron Leader Kipp

Flying Officer John Caine DFC

Flying Officer John Caine DFC

Flying Officer Huletsky

Flying Officer Huletsky

Caine and Sherf

Caine and Sherf

Joan0005

Joan Jamieson, standing pointing at a wall map.