RAF Little Snoring – not a sleepy village 70 years ago.

Pierre Lagacé:

Thank you so much for this trail.

Originally posted on Aviation Trails:

The second airfield on this part of the trail, takes us further north, to a little village and small airfield. It also features one of only a few round towered churches that hold some remarkable records of the region’s history.

RAF Little Snoring

Little Snoring is as its name suggests, a quiet hamlet deep in the heart of Norfolk. Surrounded by beautiful countryside, it boasts a superb round towered church (another called St. Andrew’s) that holds a remarkable little gem of historical significance.

various 002 The Village sign shows Little Snoring’s aviation history. The airfield, to the North East, was originally opened in 1943, late in the war, as a satellite for nearby Foulsham. It had three runways: 2 constructed of concrete 4,199 ft (1,280 m) in length, (01/19 and 13/31) and one 07/25 of 6,004 ft (1,830 m) again in concrete. As with other airfields it was a typical ‘A’ shape…

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RAF Foulsham, North Norfolk, Trail 22

Pierre Lagacé:

We are getting nearer and nearer…

Originally posted on Aviation Trails:

The first airfield in this Trail reveals some excellent examples of wartime architecture. A short life, but an important one, it saw a wide range of aircraft undertaking some ground breaking activities.

We visit RAF Foulsham.

RAF Foulsham

ROYAL AIR FORCE BOMBER COMMAND, 1942-1945. Halifax B Mark III, MZ817 ‘DT-O’, of No. 192 Squadron RAF after crash-landing while taking off from Foulsham, on a radar surveillance sortie. 9th December 1944*1 Foulsham, like many of its counterparts in this region played a major part in the electronic war, monitoring and jamming radar transmissions for larger formations of bombers. Despite this important and ground breaking role, Foulsham had only a short operational existence.

Built in the latter parts of 1941, Foulsham had three runways, 37 dispersals and 9 hangars. It was initially opened with light bombers of 2 Group Bomber Command. These were primarily Mitchell IIs of 98, 180 and 320 squadrons; 320 being formed entirely of…

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Little Snoring, 1945

Pierre Lagacé:

Worth reblogging don’t you think?

Originally posted on RAF 23 Squadron:

First post

April 5, 2010

This could be the start of the amazing story of the airmen of a forgotten squadron in Little Snoring.

Please leave a comment…

Picture taken in 1945 before the squadron was disbanded (Courtesy Tom Cushing via Peter Smith)

Squadron 23

No. 23 Squadron formed at Fort Grange, Gosport on 1 Sep 1915 under the command of one of the RAF’s most experienced operational pilots – Captain Louis Strange. After a brief period attempting to counter German airship flights over London, the Squadron moved to France with its FE2Bs initially employed on escort duties. By early 1917, Spad single-seaters had arrived, and were being used on offensive patrols. By the end of the War, the Squadron had converted to Dolphins, and flew these until disbanded at the end of 1919.

On 1 July 1925, No. 23 Squadron reformed at Henlow with Snipes, but these were replaced…

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Message from Dai Whittingham

Dai Whittingham wrote me yesterday. He invited me to celebrate the centenary of 23 Squadron’s formation on 1 Sep 1915.

I wanted to let you know that the No 23 Squadron Association (of which I am Chairman) will be holding a black tie dinner at the Doubletree Hotel in Lincoln, UK, on 5 September to celebrate the Centenary of the Squadron’s formation on 1 Sep 1915.  Our President, Air Chief Marshal Sir William Wratten will be present, as will a number of former Squadron commanders.  If any of your ex-23 readers or family members would like to join us they would be very welcome – we would be especially pleased to hear from any of the Mosquito generation!  The best contact for anyone interested in coming along is Matt Tunaley, who can be reached via matt.tunaley380@mod.uk.

I won’t be able to attend, but I am sending this invitation to my 23 Squadron readers or to family members who would like to join them.

logo

As a footnote, Dai added this about an exceptional pilot…

On a sad note, the Association was represented at the funeral last week of Flt Lt Alastair Lawson (Alec, as he was known by his colleagues).  I am told that the pages of his logbook recording that he “shot down 1 Ju-88 and 1 He-111, witnessed 1 EA shot down by Flak” are being preserved in a frame with Alastair’s photograph above his favoured spot in his favourite London pub, The Churchill, in Kensington Church Street, London.  It is good to know that his deeds will be brought to the attention of the customers there and, who knows, it may even spark some interest in the Squadron as well as in the man himself.

How important is this model airplane?

Pierre Lagacé:

Last reblog post so you can figure out what’s all this about.

Originally posted on My Forgotten Hobby:

Marcel on the balcony

I built this model airplane for Marcel in 2012. I was in a hurry because I wanted to give it as a gift for his 85th birthday.

At that time I knew not that much about how to paint it with the right camouflage.

Who cares about repairing it since the cleaning lady did not handle it properly and painting it correctly?

I do and Marcel does too.

Since 2010, Marcel has been trying to convince people in his hometown to pay homage to Eugene Gagnon who flew 33 missions during WWII flying on a Mosquito. Eugene survived the war, but he died in 1947 in a plane crash outside Windsor Mills, not far away from his hometown of Bromptonville, Quebec.

People go crazy when they see a Mosquito flying today.

But not in Bromptonville, Quebec.

The only Mosquito flying over Bromptonville was this model airplane, and no one noticed…

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My little visit to Marcel

Pierre Lagacé:

Why I got interested again in my forgotten hobby…
Written in September 2014

Originally posted on My Forgotten Hobby:

I visited my old friend Marcel Bergeron last Friday. I had to go to Sherbrooke and I stopped for a few hours to say hello.

Marcel is mostly responsible for all this procrastination on this blog.

This is one more reason. The last model airplane I built that I gave as a gift.

Monogram PA129-200 Mos Mint

I just happened to take a look at it under the TV set with other model airplanes he has.

Lo and behold!

Missing antenna, loose left elevator, bent pitot tube on the tail. Of course this model was made before I knew how the Mosquito of his youth hero looked like when he was flying it with RAF 23 Squadron.

Eugène Gagnon 1940

Eugene Gagnon 1921-1947

So the camouflage is all wrong as well as the decals. So what am I going to do my loyal readers?

You tell me.

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