How to Search for Unsung Heroes on This Blog?

Featured

Use the search button on the right side to look for someone’s name among more than 400 posts I wrote about this RAF squadron.

logo

Use the comment section or the contact form below to write to me like someone whose grandfather was Theo Griffiths’ navigator.

 Theo and Ric montage

 

 

Advertisements

Remembering the Fallen in World War One

From Robert Powell

Today I remember my Great Uncle Lt Lindsay Carlton Powell who flew with 23 Squadron RFC. He was killed in action whilst flying over the Cambrai Road in FE2b No 5235. He was the observer in the front of this pusher engined plane which was flown by 2nd Lt Allen. They were attacked by several Fokkers from behind and as Allen tilted the plane down so Powell could shoot back over the wing from the front mounted gun, Powell was hit in the head by enemy fire. Allen brought the plane down, but Powell died that day on the ground. He now lies in Avenses Le Comte Cemetery. Lindsay was the only son Henry James Powell and Margaret Carlton. He joined the Scots Greys before being attached to 23 Squadron RFC. He was born in 1895 and lived in Brixton and he died aged 21. By a previous marriage to Elizabeth Shapland, Henry James Powell had another son, Henry Shapland Powell, my grandfather who served in the First Word War in Gallipoli and Egypt – and survived.

Lest We Forget….

Remembrance Day 2018 – William Herbert Rogers (1920-1944)

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen and also those who survived.

A flight 23 Squadron Naples 10 November 1943

Collection Theo Griffiths (courtesy Richard Cooper)

According to my genealogical research, William Herbert Rogers was born on April 8, 1920, in Teignmouth, Devon, England. His father was William Morrott Rogers and his mother was Ellen Elizabeth Passmore (maiden name to be validated). He had one brother Earnest and two sisters Ada Winifred and Nellie (to be validated also). 

Mosquito FB Mark VI, serial HJ674, of 23 Squadron, was lost in an intruder mission over Sorbolo in the Province of Parma. The plane took off from Alghero, Sardinia, in the night of February 6,1944. The crew was F/Lt (64901) David Leslie Porter (pilot) RAFVR was taken prisoner and F/O (147669) William Herbert ROGERS (navigator) RAFVR – was killed.

F/Lt David Leslie Porter survived and became a prisoner of war. He was taken to Stalag Luft 3 according to my research. His navigator is buried in the Milan War Cemetery.

William Herbert Rogers is remembered on this Website.

Readers have contributed to this blog since 2010 when it was first created. RAF 23 Squadron was unknown to me as well as the pilots and navigators. Little by little my knowledge grew with each comment. Since 2010 there were more than 1,000 comments made.

This is post No. 420 which follows post No. 419.

Someday someone will probably comment on William Herbert Rogers or David Leslie Porter who survived the war. If this happens, my interest about 23 Squadron will be rekindled once more, and I will write another post.

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen and also those who survived.

William Herbert Rogers and David Leslie Porter are probably on this group picture. I have no way to tell. 

a-flight-23-squadron-naples-10-november-1943-bw

A Flight 23 Squadron
10 November 1943
Naples

Remembrance Day 2018

This blog is all about remembering the Fallen.

I found this message in my inbox this morning as I was cleaning it up.

Hello, thanks for your wonderful blog. Nothing about Captain D. Porter and Lieut. W.H. Rogers? They died on February 6, 1944 near my town (Reggio Emilia).

I felt it was important to follow up on it. I did not have anything about this crew so I asked for more information.

The reply was as fast as a Mosquito!

Mosquito FB-VI serial HJ674, 23 Squadron, lost in an intruder mission over SORBOLO (Province of Parma), from ALGHERO, in the night of February 6,1944. Crew F/Lt (64901) David Leslie PORTER (pilot) RAFVR – PoW and F/O (147669) William Herbert ROGERS (nav.) RAFVR – killed.

This is how I still start…

http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=72781

I know some of my readers might help with this.

Ted’s Log Book page – March 17th, 1945

First entry: Freshman operation

Take-off 18:18

Plane Mosquito Mk VI YP-D

Pilot Flight Lieutenant Marks

Biblis area – Uneventful

Duration: 4:10

On March 17th, 1945, Ted Gosling flew on his first operation of the war. Ted Gosling’s relatives have been sharing information since 2013.

Jeremy is the latest one.

Hi Pierre

Hope you are very well. It’s been a long time since I sent you the information on my grandfather Ft Lt E L Gosling, a navigator on Mosquitos at the end of the war with 23 Squadron.

I’ve kept in touch with your page with interest since though. Congratulations on collating such body of work to commemorate these brave men.

I have recently come into possession of my grandfather’s RAF log book through his niece and thought I’d share some pages of interest with you. They are from 1945 and show operation info (including shooting up a train and a sighting of an Me 262), the VE Day fly past over London and the final day of the squadron at Little Snoring. Thought they might be of interest to you and your readers.

I’ve also got his original navigation books and a letter to the author of a book on 100 Group in which he details the use of different radar in Mosquitos.

My best wishes

Jeremy

Arthur David Bishop’s War Medals – the Africa Star

artefacts

Along with his grandfather’s blood-stained wings, Richard sent me this photo of his grandfather’s war medals.

group of medals

On the left we see the Africa Star

The Africa Star

The next medal is the 1939-1945 Star

1939-1945 Star

Then the Air Crew Europe Star

Air Crew Europe Star

The Defence Medal

WW2 Defence Medal

Finally the War Medal 1939-1945.

WW2 War Medal

Each one has a meaning. Here is the description of the Africa Star.

WW2_Africa_Star

The Star was awarded for one more day’s service in North Africa between 10th June, 1940 and 12th May, 1943, both dates inclusive.

The Star was awarded for the following qualifications and operations:

Navy and Merchant Navy – Any Service at sea in the Mediterranean between 10th June, 1940 and 12th May, 1943, and or service in support of the campaigns in Abyssinia, Somaliland and Eritrea. Naval service ashore in the same areas as the army would also qualify. Members of the Merchant Navy who took part in the operations off the coast of Morocco between 8th November, 1942 and 12th May, 1943 would also qualify.

Army – The qualification is the entry into North Africa on the establishment of an operational unit. Service in Abyssinia, The Somaliland’s, Entitres, Sudan and Malta.

R.A.F – The qualification was to have landed in, or flown over, any of the areas previously mentioned (except West Africa), or territory occupied by the enemy.

Source: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/medals/africa-star

Since the Africa Star was awarded for one more day’s service in North Africa between 10th June, 1940 and 12th May, 1943, both dates inclusive, this means that Arthur David Bishop was in North Africa sometime between 10th June, 1940 and 12th May, 1943, both dates inclusive, before being posted to an Initial Training Wing, then to No. 14 P.A.C.T. which opened in June 1943.

20180911_173430

No 14 Centre, Preliminary Air Crew Training Wing was formed on 20 June 1943 at Cheltenham and presumably disbanded on 2 March 1945. (Source)

Since Arthur David Bishop was born September 24, 1925. He probably enlisted  on September 24, 1942 when he was 17 years-old unless he lied on his age and enlisted earlier. My guess is that he enlisted in the RAF as a ground crew, served in North Africa, and then asked for a transfer for air crew training.

Without his record of service there is no way of knowing.

Next time, this medal will shed more light on what happened to this unsung Mosquito pilot…

Air Crew Europe Star

The Air Crew Europe Star

 

Order of wear

Campaign medals are not listed by name in the order of wear prescribed by the British Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood, but are worn in order of the date of the campaign for which awarded.[14]

The order of wear of the Second World War campaign stars was determined by their respective campaign start dates and by the campaign’s duration. This is the order worn, even when a recipient qualified for them in a different order. The Defence Medal and War Medal are worn after the stars.[15]

Source Wikipedia

Arthur David Bishop’s Blood-stained Wings

 

This is the untold story of a Mosquito pilot who survived the war, but never talked much about his ordeal. We have little to go on except for a group photo and names printed under it.

A.C. 2 Arthur David Bishop is third cadet on the left in the first row.

That group photo was given to him by someone who had visited him when he was in a hospital in Scotland. According to the family, Arthur had been shot down over France and his navigator, whose nickname was “Carrotts”, was killed.

The family always thought “Carrotts” was A.C. Carrott seen on the same group photo.

I believe Arthur David Bishop’s navigator was not A.C. Carrott, but someone else. Yesterday I found A.C. Carrott’s name in the book Missing Believe Killed – The Royal Air Force and the Search for Missing Aircrew 1939 – 1952.

The search goes on for Arthur David Bishop and his navigator whose nickname was “Carrotts”, and hopefully, names on the group picture might bring more clues.

As well as Arthur David Bishop’s war medals…

And this information shared by Arthur David Bishop’s daugther… 

Arthur David Bishop was based in Torquay, (Paignton) in Devon for a while. He was also mentioned in despatches as well. He lived in Slough, and was the only son of Gordon and Helen (Betty) Bishop. We believe he underwent his training at Hendon which was a training flying school before it changed to become a museum. He married Edith May Blank after the war. He spent a year in a quarantine hospital / clinic because he got TB while being treated for his injuries sustained (a collapsed lung & several shrapnel wounds) when the plane he was flying was shot down on the French side of the German border in 1944.

Use the comment section or the contact form below to leave a message.