Chronology: 535 Squadron RAF Ercall, Shropshire from 2 September 1942 to 21 January 1943

George Stewart Hough’s relatives have been found…
Well it’s more they found this blog.

mystery-pilot1

RAF 23 Squadron

Always interesting to receive information from Robert Harris. It’s a great way to reach out for people related to the airmen found in R.C. Harris’ s logbook or on a few of his pictures.

535 airmen pilots

We now know that the picture above is about 535 Squadron.

Robert added this information about this squadron.

R.C Harris – 535 Squadron RAF Ercall, Shropshire from 02/09/1942 to 21/01/1943.

Aircraft/glider flown in:

Havoc II,

Boston III,

Tiger Moth,

Airspeed Horsa,

Havoc flights x 14

Boston flights x 63

Tiger Moth x 1

Horsa x 1

Aircraft numbers:

Havoc – AH450 , AH479. 

Boston – AL707, W8309, Z2214, W8227, W8393, Z2214. 

Tiger Moth – DE489. 

Horsa – no number.

Number of flights (in all aircraft): 79. 

Flights lasting one hour or less:  30.

Night flights: 35.

Flying Hours:-

Total Flying Hours with 535 Squadron

Day

Night

 

150.50

71.05

 Pilots…

View original post 308 more words

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Chronology: 535 Squadron RAF Ercall, Shropshire from 2 September 1942 to 21 January 1943

Always interesting to receive information from Robert Harris. It’s a great way to reach out for people related to the airmen found in R.C. Harris’ s logbook or on a few of his pictures.

535 airmen pilots

We now know that the picture above is about 535 Squadron.

Robert added this information about this squadron.

R.C Harris – 535 Squadron RAF Ercall, Shropshire from 02/09/1942 to 21/01/1943.

Aircraft/glider flown in:

Havoc II,

Boston III,

Tiger Moth,

Airspeed Horsa,

Havoc flights x 14

Boston flights x 63

Tiger Moth x 1

Horsa x 1

Aircraft numbers:

Havoc – AH450 , AH479. 

Boston – AL707, W8309, Z2214, W8227, W8393, Z2214. 

Tiger Moth – DE489. 

Horsa – no number.

Number of flights (in all aircraft): 79. 

Flights lasting one hour or less:  30.

Night flights: 35.

Flying Hours:-

Total Flying Hours with 535 Squadron

Day

Night

 

150.50

71.05

 Pilots flown with at 535 Squadron:- 

Pilot’s name

Number of Flights

Sgt Hough

71

Sgt Massey

2

Sgt Christensen

1

PO Scorer

1

S/Ldr Moloney

1

Sgt Coulson

1

PO Blanshard

1

FO Thornton

1

Contents of the “Remarks” section of the log book:- 

NFT – night flying tests x 34

NFT – in formation x 1

G.C.I Gropa Control x 18

G.C.I. (cancelled) x 3

G.C.I Full Satellite Exposure x1

G.C.I. Full Turbinlite x 2

G.C.I. Gropa W/T Controlled x 1

G.C.I (Hack Green) calibration x 1

G.C.I Comberton Dotty x 1

G.C.I.Control Dotty x 1

G.C.I. Controlled Bullseye x 1

Aerobatics (spinning) x 1.  This was in the one and only flight in the Tiger Moth! The flight lasted for 55 minutes – during the day!!!

Anti Aircraft Co-operation. Gnosall. Stafford. x 1

Anti Aircraft Co-operation, Oswestry x 1

Searchlight Co-operation, Crewe (Cheshire). x 1

B.A.B.S Approaches x 1

Night formation with Hurricane x 1 (This night flight only lasted 20 minutes).

ZZ landings/ NFT x 1

Test of glider (Horsa) – this was the glider’s maiden flight!! (My father was a passenger) with Sgt Coulson as the pilot.  x 1 (The flight lasted only 15 minutes).

Calibration run for Hack Green x 1

Searchlight aided interceptions x 1 (This flight lasted 1.25  at night).

Bulls Eye x 1

Cross country day flight – Newmarket, Llanbedr, Valley. Day – 2.25 hours

Weather Test (night). 25 minute flight  

Posting with 535 Squadron was signed off by Squadron Leader B.W Moloney, Officer Commanding 535.

 Footnote

I am also sure by now that the unknown pilot with R.C. Harris with his goggles upside down is Sergeant Hough.

mystery pilot

If you are related to Sergeant Hough who was a pilot with 535 Squadron, then please contact me. I have a beautiful photo to share with you

Dad and unknown

John S. Slaney

You don’t have to buy the book They Say There Was a War.

They-Say-There-Was-a-War-Cover

John Samuel Slaney was a Hurricane pilot that was transfered to 247 Squadron after being sent to 535 Squadron. He then went on to fly Typhoons and he survived the war to tell about it.

Slaney

He was a very lucky pilot because the average number of missions before being killed while flying missions on Typhoons was around 11 or 12 missions. John Samuel Slaney shed a little light on how 535 Squadron was having fun flying alongside Havoc Turbinlites.

John Samuel Slaney wrote his memoirs… Typhoon Pilot.

While searching for it I found this.

Slaney, John S. 87

Formerly of Greensburg

John Samuel Slaney, formerly of Greensburg, passed away peacefully at home in Canonsburg on Sunday, June 22, 2008, at the age of 87. John was a highly decorated World War II RAF fighter pilot who spent the last year of the war as a POW. He was also a world-renowned metallurgist who retired from Latrobe Steel in 1986. John is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; sister, Lillian Mandviwalla, of England; son, Patrick Slaney and his partner, Susan Rice, of Massachusetts; daughter, Victoria Ross and her husband, John Ross, of Pennsylvania; son, Ian Slaney and his wife, Martina, of England; grandsons, Patrick and Alexander Ross and their wives, Allison and Rebecca; grandsons, James and Philip Clark; and great-granddaughter, Brianna Ross. John was a kind and embracing man who will be dearly missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing him. John was born in Birmingham, England, March 1, 1921. At the age of 14, John quit school to provide income for his family after his father passed away. At 18, John attempted to enlist in the military, but was turned away because he was employed as a pattern maker, a trade deemed critical to national security. Later, though, with the cooperation of his employer, he was granted permission. John joined the RAF as a fighter pilot, knowing that the average survival period was less than six months. John matured quickly as a pilot, fighting off the hazards of enemy fire and the high risks of flying single engine Spitfires, Hurricanes and Rocket Typhoons. He eventually advanced to the rank of flight lieutenant, completing 112 sorties between 1941 and 1944, before being shot down over enemy territory in Normandy on June 15, 1944, nine days after D-Day. John finished the war as a POW in Stalag Luft 1 in northern Germany. On returning home to England, John learned that King George had recognized his brave and unwavering service in defense of England by awarding him the DFC (Distinguished Flying Cross), the highest ranking medal bestowed on a surviving fighter pilot. John then entered London University’s Royal School of Mines to study metallurgy. After graduation, he pursued a career that spanned the globe from South Africa to Canada to New York state and then finally to Western Pennsylvania. In the process, John produced a number of revolutionary products and processes, including several patents for high performance alloys. One alloy developed while working for Special Metals in New York was key to preventing catastrophic failure of jet engine turbine blades due to time-weighted exposure to extremely high temperatures. John’s new alloy was quickly adopted for every new turbine blade manufactured and all existing blades were recalled from the field. Now, more than 40 years later, not one turbine blade has failed in this manner. Above all of John’s talents as a professional, perhaps the most memorable qualities to those who knew him were his kind, generous personality and passion for political change. John was a friend to all. He was always there to offer help to anyone in need, and he fought especially hard to eliminate discrimination, to support human rights, to save the environment, and to support the underprivileged. John was the kindest of fighter pilots. The family asks that in John’s memory, a donation be sent to the charity of your choice.

I know he will be missed…

John S Slaney pictures John S Slaney

Spotlight on amazing Shropshire RAF wartime project

I hope you got some popcorn… because we are back!

There was little information last week about the Havoc Turbinlite when I was searching the Internet.

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Lo and behold!

Spotlight on amazing Shropshire RAF wartime project

Source of the article

An airbase in Shropshire played a top secret role in the Second World War. Toby Neal explains.

During the Blitz which pulverised Britain’s cities our air defences struggled to find the Luftwaffe raiders in the dark – never mind shoot them down.

 1456 High Ercall

And those desperate times saw an extraordinary top secret unit operating from an airfield in the heart of the Shropshire countryside using hush-hush equipment which, the boffins hoped, would help turn the tide.

The details were so sensitive that anybody breathing a word about it would quickly be moved on to another base.

So a photo in the possession of 95-year-old Peggy Murray, of Clive, showing the mysterious 1456 Flight at RAF High Ercall, in which her late husband Bob served, is quite possibly unique.

The photo, which most likely dates from 1942, shows the personnel in the team and behind them is a Douglas Havoc bomber, with the nose covered up to hide the secret equipment installed there.

Was it the latest radar? A new type of weapon? A radio antenna, perhaps?

No, it was none of those things. In one of the most remarkable episodes of World War Two, the aircraft had been converted into a huge flying torch.

In the nose was installed a high-power searchlight, known as a Turbinlite, powered by batteries in the bomb bay. The idea was simple. The bomber would illuminate the German bomber and then an accompanying Hurricane fighter would shoot it down.

“I know more now than I did then,” said Mrs Murray.

“I knew they were working on something because I used to mix with the villagers. If anyone working on it said ‘Did you see that funny plane flying last night?’ they were moved the next day to another aerodrome. That happened fairly often.” The secret was, however, safe with her husband.

“He never spoke about it. I knew he was doing something. I teased him about it, but if I didn’t know, I couldn’t tell anything.

“They started working on it at RAF Shawbury and they tested it at RAF Honiley. We were there when Coventry was bombed. I heard it – the ground absolutely shook.

“I believe it was a Mosquito they were trying to adapt.” Her husband was part of the ground crew.

The Turbinlite team setted at High Ercall and the equipment was demonstrated to the King and Queen when they visited the air base on July 16, 1942.

Unfortunately, in action the equipment was not a success. There were problems co-ordinating the Turbinlite bomber and the accompanying fighter in the darkness. No kills were notched up by the High Ercall team – it was one of a small number of Turbinlite units at the time – and improvements in radar and the performance of night fighters rendered the “flying torch” obsolete.

Peggy relives her days as a signalman in her old signal box, which was at Yorton, but was re-built at Arley on the Severn Valley RailwayPeggy relives her days as a signalman in her old signal box, which was at Yorton, but was re-built at Arley on the Severn Valley Railway

Mrs Murray, whose first name is Margaret but has always been known as Peggy, still lives in the same house in New Street in which she was born on April 14, 1918. 

Husband Bob hailed from Alford, Aberdeenshire, and was in the pre-war RAF, which brought him to RAF Shawbury. 

The young Peggy Thomas, as she then was, met Bob at a dance at Shawbury Village Hall before the war and they married in October 1939. After the end of the Turbinlite, Bob was posted to an airfield on the south coast, and Peggy landed herself an unusual wartime job. 

“They wanted a signalman for the signal box at Yorton, and I applied for the job – and got it. I was the first woman on this line.” 

She did the work for two or three years. 

“The shifts were 7 to 3, and 3 until the 11 o’clock train had gone through, which was the last train to stop. The line was very busy – busier than at any time. They were building up the troops on the south coast. There were all the bases. Everything came by rail in those days.” 

The Yorton signal box was later dismantled and re-erected on the Severn Valley Railway at Arley. 

A few years ago Peggy rode on the SVR and, in her honour, the train stopped specially at her old haunt and she was able to pay it a nostalgic visit. 

“It was exactly the same,” she said.

Next time… we will take a look at this!

535 information

Goggles on Upside Down: Redux

Rob just sent me these names…

I could not wait until tomorrow.

Hello Pierre!

I now give you the names of the pilots that my father flew with in 535 Squadron. One of them must be the guy in the photo:

SGT Hough

SGT Massey

SGT Christensen

PO Scorer

PO Blanshard

FO Thornton

He flew with SGT Hough 60 times.

He flew with SGT Massey X 1

SGT Christensen X1

PO Scorer  X1

PO Blansard X1

FO Thornton X1

Previous to 535 he had flown with No 54 OTU and 1456 Flight:

SGT Hough for 34 times

SGT Christensen for X2

PO Blansard X1

FO Thornton X1

I wonder if the pilot is Sgt Hough?

Good evening – Rob

What seems logical would be that this is Sergeant Hough. 

Dad and Eugene

Why would his father have kept a picture of pilots he only flew a few times with?

I will go with Sergeant Hough for the time being and wait for someone to find this blog and confirm all this or go on a wild search for Sergeant Hough… 

Goggles on Upside Down

I am not the only one trying to identify R.C. Harris’ fellow airmen.

Dad and Eugene

I have compared two of the photographs sent to you – the one in full flying gear (with the goggles on upside down) and the one with the Hurricane.  I am sure that the guy in the flying gear is the same one as the one  on the extreme left  (standing foreground) in the Hurricane photo.  Knowing you, you are already well ahead of me but I thought I would just mention it!!  I wonder who he was and if he is still alive.

535 Squadron RC Harris

This time it’s Robert’s turn to get all excited…

I think he hit the right button.

We have a very rare 535 Squadron picture of some of its pilots and navigators!

mystery pilot

Now the only thing missing is for Robert to look for the name of the pilot in his father’s logbook when he was with 535 Squadron.

The mystery pilot’s name is in there!

I can visualise Robert scrambling and searching his father’s logbook for the name and scanning the page for us to share his excitement.

R.C. Harris Radar Operator

I was afraid to scare away Robert with all this research about his father. I am glad he is enjoying it. I think he is going to enjoy this post.

This would be similar to missions flown by R.C. Harris as a radar operator aboard a Havoc Turbinlite.

Havoc Mark II

Very dangerous missions indeed.

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Source of the article

The Turbinlite Havoc was a Douglas Boston with a large searchlight in the nose. This was powered by a heavy load of batteries carried in the bomb bay. Behind the batteries and cut off from the pilot was the rear cockpit where the RO, wearing a pilot type parachute, sat in an uncomfortable bucket seat surrounded by his AI equipment which consisted of several metal boxes and the CRTs. He also had the bottles for his oxygen supply, an altimeter and an ASI.

A night fighter worked with a GCI (Ground Controlled Interception) station which directed it close enough to a target for the RO to see it on AI. The nightfighter would move in unseen, get a visual on the target and, if it was an enemy aircraft, open fire. Operations with a Turbinlite Havoc were more complicated for the idea was that having found the target with the AI the searchlight would be used to illuminate it, at which juncture a Hurricane accompanying the Havoc would complete the attack. At night close and accurate formation flying was required otherwise the Hurricane could all too easily go astray. The only aids for the Hurricane pilot were dimly lit strips of white paint on our wings and, if in cloud, the navigation lights were put on. I never felt comfortable flying in daylight with a Hurricane’s wing tucked inside ours; at night, in cloud with the Hurricane following our sometimes quite violent manoeuvres I felt even less comfortable!

Hibaldstow was a satellite of Kirton Lindsey (correctly Kirton-in-Lindsey), the home of two Polish Spitfire squadrons. It was a grass airfield with no runways, but did have fine brick buildings. Hibaldstow had three runways, with an up-to-date lighting system, but everything else was makeshift. The facilities were so widely spread out that we had to go by truck to and from dispersal (the term for the area where the crew room and flight offices were sited and where the aircraft were dispersed on hard standings and alongside the perimeter track). The surrounding country was bleak, flat and soggy. To have an evening out entailed a three mile journey to Kirton Lindsey to go to a NAAFI dance or to the station cinema. As soon as I had bought a bicycle I went over quite frequently, sometimes giving Tony a lift on the crossbar. I also managed to get about a bit on the bicycle, on one occasion going to Hull and on another to Church Fenton, a nightfighter airfield in south Yorkshire.

We had to choose the callsign we would use to identify ourselves and the Hurricane pilot with us. Although I did not drink, I came up with “Whisky and Soda”. After a gentle indoctrination consisting of local flying, searchlight co-operation exercises, turning on our light and working with Patrington GCI, Whisky was ready to go to war.

Our first real operation was on 1 August 1942 when we carried out an uneventful patrol off the mouth of the Humber. We came into land, touched down and I knew immediately that something was wrong for the aircraft was bouncing all over the place. I was thrown about and stunned. When I became aware of my surroundings the aircraft was at rest. I could get no answer from Tony so opened my hatch to step out so I could go to see what had happened to him. But I did not realise that the tail was high in the air for the nose wheel had collapsed. I fell twelve feet onto the runway. Just before I passed out for the second time I saw that the Flight Commander was already on the scene and was getting Tony out. I came to in the ambulance and, still on the stretcher, was carried into the operating room in sick quarters. I was covered with blood but Tony was unharmed. The MO cleaned me up and having found only superficial injuries told us to go to the mess and talk about the incident to anyone who would listen. I have a small scar over my right eye as a memento of the event.

We had landed two fields short of the runway, crossed several ditches and fences, the main road and then gone through a barbed wire entanglement onto the runway. There was no explanation why Tony had so misjudged the touch down. It was just a mistake. He was sent off to do a few approaches by himself whilst I recovered, and that was the end of the matter.

Within a few days all was back to normal: carrying out an NFT then at dusk going to the crew room. If we were not training or making a routine flight we would be wearing flying gear whilst waiting for an order to scramble (one seldom came). We had supper between about 10 o’clock and midnight then, if not stood down, would sleep on bunks in the crew room. There was plenty of spare time to fill: we played ludo and shoveha’penny, talked and dozed.

On 1 September the flight became 538 Squadron, the CO still being Squadron Leader C V Winn (1). I myself had been remustered as a Navigator (Radio) in July as Observers were henceforward to be called Navigators. But turning us into a squadron changed nothing. We knew we were wasting our time for it had been clear for months that the Turbinlite idea was not a success. Certainly the GCI controllers had no faith in the Turbinlite for I have a log book entry for 15 December reading, “GCI – Huns about so kept out of way”!

The C in C Fighter Command, Air Marshal Sir Sholto Douglas visited our crew room one evening. The view firmly expressed to him by the CO was that we wanted guns. I cannot recall the exact answer but it was on the lines that we could not have them and should be happy with the equipment we had. This seemed odd at the time and in retrospect even odder for the conversion work would have been simple and the result a considerable augmentation of the already proven answer to the night bomber: an aircraft providing a stable gun platform and easy to fly at night, combined with AI and a heavy armament.

Tony and I had a near disaster over the Humber. We were climbing and had reached about 8,000 feet when the aircraft went into a shallow dive. Tony did not answer when I called him on the intercom and from the altimeter and the ASI I saw the dive was getting steeper and the speed building up. Tony was still not answering and I realised that the aircraft was going out of control. At 4,000 feet I called over the intercom to say I was balling out. I struggled from my seat and was about to disconnect my intercom and undo the hatch when I felt the aircraft levelling out. A very weak voice said, “Chalky, turn off your oxygen”. This did not make sense to me , but I did what Tony said. His voice got stronger but obviously something was wrong. We went straight back to Hibaldstow..

The next day the cause of the trouble was discovered. After the NFT Tony had left his helmet and oxygen mask under the windscreen.  There was a slight leak in the screen’s de-icing system and de-icing fluid had dripped into the oxygen tube. The instructions about using oxygen were that at night we had to have it on from ground level. Tony had not done this: he had turned it on at 8,000 feet, got a blast of de-icing fluid and started to pass out. Before he went unconscious he realised that the oxygen was the cause of the trouble and had pulled off the Oxygen mask. He then started to recover and at that point warned me, forgetting I had my own oxygen system. Being Tony he managed to talk himself out of that spot of bother!

Perhaps the C in C did understand the situation for in January 1943 the squadron was disbanded, as were all the other Turbinlite units. Tony went as an Instructor at 12 SFTS (Service Flying Training School), Grantham; I was sent to Kirton Lindsey to await a posting. I spent my time with another sergeant running the Watch Office, but as the Spitfire squadrons looked after themselves the job involved nothing much more than answering the telephone and laying a flare path of paraffin flares each evening.

I had a lot of spare time so went regularly to the station gym to do PT. Once a week I took the bus to Scunthorpe, spending the evening in the dance hall at the municipal swimming baths. It was there that I came face to face with an air gunner from Elsham Wolds who looked so much like me that we could have been identical twins. I never saw him again.

I had a peaceful enough Job but could not avoid having a disaster. A tractor used for towing bits of the flare path was kept outside the Watch Office. It was driven by an LAC, who was the only person who knew how to lay the flare path. I had not the foggiest notion about how to drive but having watched the LAC it seemed quite simple. One quiet afternoon I got on the tractor, pulled the starter and promptly went backwards into a brick air raid shelter. The damage was tremendous. A brick wall 20 feet long and 8 feet high had fallen over leaving the shelter a ruin. When the LAC came on duty I asked what he thought should be done. He decided to hide the tractor for a few days, told me to say nothing about the incident and suggested I should keep my fingers crossed that the Station Commander did not spot that one of his fine brick buildings was a ruin. He never did, at least not before my posting came.

(1) C V Winn CBE DSO DFC retired from the RAF in 1975 as an Air Vice-Marshal and died on 20 September 1988.

Footnote

I have a feeling this is R.C. Harris and his pilot when he was a radar operator with 535 Squadron.

Just a feeling…

Dad and Eugene

Footnote to the footnote…

Did any reader notice that R.C. Harris has his googles  upside down?

Mystery Airmen

Pure selfish pleasure on my part about sharing all the research I have done since 2010 when someone contacted me to learn more about his hero when he was a teenager in the 1940s.

Marcel Bergeron at the crash scene  

Marcel Bergeron in front of Eugene’s Seabee on October 22, 1947

Marcel Bergeron was 83 in 2010. The only document he had in his possession was Eugene Gagnon’s discharge papers.

Discharge papers page 1

Someone else had a kind of retouched photograph.

eugene-gagnon1

That was enough to send me on a wild search  for this pilot who had won a DFC and died in a plane crash on October 21, 1947.

numérisation0013

I wonder if Robert Harris knew what he was getting into when he started to share pictures and logbook pages of his father last week. I don’t know if he can keep up with all I am writing about his father though.

I just can’t stop searching… and writing about what I am finding.

scan0002

RAF 535 Squadron pilots and navigators

Now that we know why R.C. Harris was  on this picture, where it was taken,  and when he was stationed there, the next unanswered question is who were the other airmen with him on that picture?

I can see four pilots with four other airmen who I suspect are navigator/observer on Havoc or Boston III.

535 airmen pilots

Everything seems logical except why were they posing in front of a Hurricane IIc and not a Turbinlite Boston II?

Havoc Turbinlite

There is very little information and pictures found on the Internet about pilots and navigators with RAF 535 Squadron.

In fact none whatsoever!

So this is somewhat a very precious and rare picture isn’t it?

535 Squadron RC Harris

Only one airman is identified for now: R.C. Harris.

There was very little information and pictures found on the Internet about pilots and navigators with RAF 23 Squadron.

This is how this blog evolved in the first place since 2010 with only this: the only picture I had of Eugene Gagnon.

eugene-gagnon1

Since then people have been sharing so much…

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Mysterious Hurricane

What was R.C. Harris doing on this picture. He was a navigator/observer not a fighter pilot?

 scan0002

Was he visiting a friend from another squadron flying Hurricanes IIc?

His son Robert Harris had the answer with his chronology I posted last time.

Search no more!

No.535  Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to  operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters. The aim  was for the Havoc to find an enemy bomber with its radar, then illuminate it  with its searchlight, allowing a pair of Hurricanes to shoot it down. The  initial scheme, using special Turbinlite flights and fighters from nearby fighter  squadrons failed, partly because the fighters often failed to arrive. In an  attempt to solve this problem the Turbinlite flights were turned into  squadrons, and given both types of aircraft, but by the autumn of 1942 more  suitable night fighters were entering service in significant numbers, and the  Turbinlite squadrons were disbanded on 25 January 1943.

No.535  Squadron was formed from No.1456 Flight at High Ercall (Shropshire) and  remained there until it was disbanded.

Aircraft

September 1942-January 1943 Douglas Havoc I and II Hawker Hurricane IIB, IIC, X, XI and XII

Location    September 1942-January 1943: High Ercall

Squadron Codes: –

Duty September  1942-January 1943: Turbinlite Squadron

Source:

http://www.historyofwar.org/air/units/RAF/535_wwII.html

Richard Craig Harris joined 535 Squadron on 2 September 1942 to 21 January 1943. Aircraft types flown in: Havoc, Tiger Moth, Boston.

IWM-MH5710-Havoc

Turbinlite Havoc IWM image

scan0002

RAF 535 Squadron

Click here for more on the Havoc Turbinlite.

Mysterious Hurricane IIc? Not anymore…